Revisiting one of my favorite spurs in Texas

 

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View of spur from road looking west.

Along the Union Pacific in San Marcos, Texas, there’s an interesting short spur.  The spur was busy June 16, 2014 .  Two cars filled with what appears to be oats were spotted.  I discussed this same spur during the series on derails March 29, 2014.

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CNW 490119 spotted in San Marcos, TX on June 16, 2014

The unloading operation is simple and great for a model railroad–lots of operations, little space required.  All you need is an auger.

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There are no kits of an unloader of this nature.  It is a nice scratch-building opportunity.  Here is a post of one modeller’s efforts.

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The oats unload into this bin.

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Bin into which the oats are unloaded.

Then brought up the auger and put into a truck.

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CGEX 1781 spotted at San Marcos, Texas, June 16, 2014

This time, there was a second car waiting to be unloaded.  It had an aging, but attractive Cargill logo.

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The derail I discussed March 29 is still on the job!

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Here is an aerial of the spur.

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Aerial of spur

Here is a close-up.  Truck to which the oats are unloaded can be seen in this photo.

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Note truck with red cab standing by to receive unloaded oats.

Short spurs like this can add a lot of operational interest to layouts.

 

 

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Chow for cows!

New Mexico has approximately 150 dairies, with the largest average herd size (2088) in the nation. New Mexico is currently ranked 9th in the nation for milk production and 5th in the nation for cheese production.

The dairy industry was really beginning to take off in Roswell in the early 1990s (and before).  Many covered hoppers of feed were being delivered just south of Roswell at a siding which is featured on my layout.

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The siding along the top represents the area where  about 6 covered hoppers were typically spotted.  It will be an important source of traffic on the layout.

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The siding was (and still is) along Hwy 285, just south of Roswell. The siding is still periodically used to bring in feed. Note the auger (white) which is used to transfer the grain to truck to be transported to area dairies.

I remember cuts of about a half dozen covered hoppers frequently spotted here.  This feed and mostly locally grown alfalfa would feed the emerging dairy herds in the area.  It was an important source of ATSF traffic around Roswell in the 1990s.  It is far larger now.  There are now a number of large feed operations between Roswell and Carlsbad.

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I took this photo in 1994. Six cars were spotted at this time.

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Common road names included C&NW (pictured here), ATSF, BN, MP and MKT as well as private companies.