In praise of beer inclusiveness…

Here’s a “ridiculous amount of other stuff” post (see tag line above).

(Note/warning:  I occasionally post on other loves (non-rail), as inspired, on beer, food, music, history, National Parks and Forests, sports, fishing, architecture, books, etc.)

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When it comes to beer, I am inclusive.  I have friends who will only drink particular microbrews.  They wouldn’t be caught dead drinking a Coors or PBR in public.

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This post is to extol American beer in all forms–macrobrews and microbrews.  What could be more American than drinking American beer?  America has so many great brews now, that I never buy foreign beer any longer.  No need.

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But I also don’t shy away from mass produced American beer.  Somehow, it seems wholesome to sometimes buy beer made in American factories/breweries that employ hundreds of people and small microbreweries.  If macrobrews were good enough for our fathers (and mothers), why not for us as well?

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These pictures reinforce that for me.  What’s wrong with a simpler time when we all didn’t feel the need to have 3000 sq. foot homes, home theaters and BMWs?  If I want an ice cold PBR, Coors, Schlitz or Miller, I am going to have one.  To hell with what others think.  I won’t be intimidated or shamed from having a good macrobrew sometimes.  Don’t folks in these pictures look pretty classy?

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I even wish I could add an ice cold Falstaff to that list above!  I miss drinking Falstaff as a very young man.  It was one of my dad’s beers.  Maybe one day…Pabst is thinking about re-launching Falstaff.  Be great if it tasted like the Falstaff I knew in the late 1970s (I was really too young to drink).  It was a bit distinctive.

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When you look at these old advertisements, it just seems right to have a good, regular beer sometimes.  I don’t want all our big breweries to go away.  I get a kick out of driving by them and smelling that distinctive smell.

To all my railfan readers, I also enjoy seeing a string or two of covered hoppers bringing in ingredients.  Up until a decade ago or so, most beer was hauled by boxcar.  Much is still hauled by rail, but often containerized (not quite the same as driving by a distributor and seeing a few boxcars being unloaded.).

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Ingredients (barley) from the Northwest coming into the Shiner Brewery in 2011 in Shiner Texas.  “Nothing’s finer than an ice cold Shiner!” –©C Hunt photo

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Oh well, what do I know?  I still mow my own yard, love to watch football and baseball, barbeque on the weekends with wood and charcoal, think Rockford Files was a great show, and think factories should stay in America (not intended as a political statement at all, just a fact).  I guess I’m old fashioned.

Again, I still enjoy a great IPA from time to time and have written a couple of posts about one of my favorite IPAs–Ballantines.  I just discovered a great one a few weeks ago in Washington State–Backwood Brewing’s Logyard IPA.  Sadly, I can’t get it where I live.

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I’m getting thirsty.  I think I may have an ice cold Schlitz in the fridge.

Here’s to a few good American macrobrews!

 

 

 

 

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