Perlite, Scoria and Scenery in the closing days of the Rio Grande

I am a big fan of the Denver, Rio Grande and Western.  Unfortunately, the DRGW began to disappear in the 1990s as the effects of its 1986 merger with the Southern Pacific influence grew, but it really began to disappear in the early 2000s as the effects of its 1996 merger with the Union Pacific really took hold.  One of many segments of the Rio Grande that was interesting and scenic was the Alamosa Subdivision.  This post is going to focus on operations around Antonito, Colorado.

1984

The first segment will focus on when B. Smith visited the line in July of 1984.  It was pure DRGW then.

Perlite loads near Antonito being switched by local train in July 1984. --©photo by B. Smith

Perlite loads near Antonito being switched by local train in July 1984. –©photo by B. Smith

Local at Antonito.  Engine (GP-40) has run around its train after arriving from Alamosa.--

Local at Antonito. Engine #3086 (GP-40) has run around its train after arriving from Alamosa. –©photo by B. Smith

Covered hopper of perlite in the consist.  What a great paint scheme!

Covered hopper of perlite in the consist. What a great paint scheme! –©photo by B. Smith

Local at Antonito about to return to Alamosa with train of perlite loads.

Local at Antonito about to return to Alamosa with train of perlite loads.  –©photo by B. Smith

2003

In 2003, James Griffin documented the action in the closing days of action that reflected the DRGW heritage of the line.  His website does a great job of capturing that day in 2003 and I encourage you to check it out.

Griffin captured a photo of this DRGW perlite car sitting in Alamosa as he waited for the train coming down from Pueblo, CO. March 7, 2003.--©photo by James Griffin.

Griffin captured a photo of this DRGW perlite car sitting in Alamosa as he waited for the train coming down from Pueblo, CO. March 7, 2003.–©photo by James Griffin.

train makes it way to Alamosa, east of Fort Garland, CO.

Train makes it way to Alamosa, east of Fort Garland, CO. –©photo by James Griffin.

Near Trinchera Ranch Road, CO

Stunning scenery near Trinchera Ranch Road, CO. –©photo by James Griffin.

Scoria loading into open hoppers south of Antonito.--©photo by James Griffin.

Scoria loading into open hoppers south of Antonito.  Locally mined scoria was added to the traffic mix after B. Smith’s visit in 1984.  Scoria is volcanic rock primarily used for landscaping.–©photo by James Griffin.

Leaving the nearby perlite plant--©photo by James Griffin.

Leaving the nearby perlite plant which sits a little south of the scoria loading site.–©photo by James Griffin.

This is only a small sample of the great photos James Griffin offers on his site.

Today

Today the line is now operated by the San Luis & Rio Grande which interchanges with UP at Walsenburg, CO.  The spirit of the Rio grande lives on in the paint scheme of the SL&RG and the occasional DRGW car that makes an appearance.

San Luis and Rio Grande unit #116  in Walsenburg, CO April 4, 2014

San Luis and Rio Grande unit #116 in Walsenburg, CO April 4, 2014 — photo by Paul Leach

Modeler’s note:  The DRGW offers interesting modelling possibilities during almost any of its eras.  The 1996 to early-2000s window particularly intrigues me because of the potential to run mostly DRGW and SP motive power with the cars of the DRGW, SP, SSW (Cotton Belt), UP, Chicago and Northwestern, Missouri Pacific and Western Pacific all home road cars.

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Perlite, Scoria and Scenery in the closing days of the Rio Grande

  1. Great post! I love seeing trains and find them very interesting.

    We live in Fort Collins and found the noises, both the sound of the train running and the whistles kind of ‘romantic’ in a way when we first moved here, but they quickly became annoying when trying to sleep. At this point however, I almost never even notice them!

    Like

  2. Pingback: Modelling Scoria Operations | Rails West

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s