ATSF (and Burlington Northern) Heritage, Part II (Are there more?)

Yes.  There are more.

BNSF #480654 between Matfield and Aikman KS on Sep 21 2014. ©photo by Dan Rohrback.

BNSF #480654 between Matfield and Aikman KS on Sep 21 2014. ©photo by Dan Rohrback.

Here is at least a partial list of the 26 Heritage Cars of the BNSF.  (There were 27, but sadly one was wrecked.)
477432, Great Northern Heritage
477433, Great Northern Heritage
480539, Frisco Heritage
480654 SP&S Heritage
482111, SP&S Heritage
482554, SP&S Heritage
482825, Colorado and Southern Heritage
483110, Frisco Heritage
484002, Santa Fe Heritage
485059, Burlington Northern Heritage
485171, Santa Fe Heritage
485233, The Denver Road Heritage
485609, Northern Pacific Heritage
485704, Burlington Northern Heritage
485980, Colorado and Southern Heritage
486114, Burlington Route Heritage
486742, Frisco Heritage
486868, Colorado and Southern Heritage—-Destroyed 4/14. Unknown if will be replaced.
487379, The Denver Road Heritage
489368, Great Northern Heritage*
*This information is courtesy of — http://twincitiesrailfan.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=2154
BNSF #483110 in Aberdeen, SD on Feb 27 2013.

BNSF #483110 in Aberdeen, SD on Feb 27 2013.  Photo by Nick Smith, courtesy of www.rrpicturearchives.net.

Interestingly, Overland Hobbies announced today that Athearn will produce HO cars in the Colorado and Southern, the Denver Road and Santa Fe heritage schemes.  See —

http://campaign.r20.constantcontact.com/render?ca=4015dc2e-4540-4e7b-bf6f-bbbd709b115d&c=f62f7350-526b-11e3-b371-d4ae52710c75&ch=f6fcae60-526b-11e3-b3fe-d4ae52710c75
These three cars were featured in part I of this series.
Keep an eye out for these interesting cars!

ATSF (and Burlington Northern) Heritage

A number of railroads are commemorating their heritage through special locomotive paint schemes.  The BNSF, created when the ATSF and Burlington Northern merged in 1996, chose a different method.

BNSF has painted a number of covered hoppers in commemorative schemes.  Unlike the normal boxcar red of most BNSF covered hoppers…

BNSF #   in Brady, Texas    2008.  photo by C. Hunt

BNSF #486489 in Brady, Texas June 20, 2008. –photo by C. Hunt

…these cars are light gray so they really stand out in BNSF consists.

BNSF  485171 Kansas City_MO_John_Rus_2014-09-03_82209

BNSF #485171 in Kansas City, MO September 3, 2014. ©photo by John Rus, courtesy of http://www.railcarphotos.com/ (Opening photo is also a portion of this nice photo by John Rus.)

BNSF 477433 in Fort Worth TX May 8, 2013.  ©photo by Roberto Alaniz, courtesy www.rrpicturearchives.net/

BNSF #477433 in Fort Worth TX May 8, 2013. ©photo by Roberto Alaniz, courtesy http://www.rrpicturearchives.net/

This car honors the Great Northern.  The GN became part of the BN in 1970.

BNSF 485609 Old Monroe MO May 13 2014 Shane Gillam copyright rrpa

BNSF #485609 in Old Monroe, MO on May 13 2014 ©photo Shane Gillam, courtesy http://www.rrpicturearchives.net/

The Northern Pacific became part of the BN at the same time.

What is also great is that the BNSF has chosen to honor its lesser known heritage roads.

BNSF 486868 in Barr Lake,  CO on Dec 30 2013.  http://www.railpictures.net/

BNSF #486868 in Barr Lake, CO on Dec 30 2013. ©photo by John Shine, courtesy of http://www.railpictures.net/

Though formally part of the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy for decades, the Colorado and Southern was absorbed into the BN in 1981.

BNSF 485233 in Fort Worth, TX on Dec 6 2013. Roberto Alaniz rrpa not copy

BNSF #485233 in Fort Worth, TX on Dec 6 2013. ©photo by Roberto Alaniz, courtesy of http://www.railpictures.net

Though long affiliated with the Colorado and Southern Railway, the Fort Worth and Denver, “The Denver Road,” became part of the BN in 1982.

Thankfully, each of these great photographers captured these cars before any tagging (graffiti) occurred.

I hope this effort on the part of railroads to honor their heritage continues!

Moving cars …(without a locomotive) — Part III

In Part I and Part II of this series, we looked at prototype methods of moving cars without locomotives.

In this post, we are going check out some HO scale car pulling operations on B. Smith’s LCN RR.

The scoria operation has a car puller winch pictured below.

See small orange "light house-shaped" object with cabling.

See small orange “light house-shaped” object with cabling.

The cables are attached to the car, and the winch is employed to shuttle to car to the correct loading position.

The cables are attached to the car, and the winch is employed to shuttle to car to the correct loading position.

Let’s head down the track to a different system.

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Max-Flo Frac Sand company. (The car puller just right of the red shack was made with parts from the scrap box. including a reel from an old ship model.)

Max-Flow Frac Sand has a car puller cable and reel system to position covered hopper outlet gates over the auger hole.  A tractor is still used to move the cars across the road crossing.  The car puller was made with parts from the scrap box.  I found a reel from an old ship model.

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Another view at Max-Flo.

All right, let’s go check some “simpler” operations.

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The tractor at Hirschfeld shoves a load out of the fabrication building so another car can be spotted for loading.

Hirschfeld Steel uses a modified John Deere tractor whose wheels are wide enough to fit outside of the rails.

John Deere moving cars at Hirshfield Steel.

John Deere moving cars at Hirshfield Steel.

A steel plate has been welded to the front of the tractor to protect the radiator

A steel plate has been welded to the front of the tractor to protect the radiator

The Burnt Biscuit Bakery uses an old Chevy pickup whose bed has been removed and a railroad coupler attached to move tank cars of corn syrup and airslides of flour.

The bakery has an old truck fitted with a coupler to move cars around.  

The bakery has an old truck fitted with a coupler to move cars around.

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Close-up of interesting approach to moving cars.

Indeed, there are many ways to move cars around without a locomotive.  For a one car scenarios even man-powered solutions may work.  Thinking about how the customers on your layout function in the real word with the challenges offered by grates, spouts, etc., makes for richer, more realistic operations.

 

Moving cars …(without a locomotive) — Part II

In this post, we will look at a few businesses in West Texas on the Texas Pacifico Railroad that need to move cars without the help of a locomotive.  (The October edition of Trains Magazine has a nice article on the Texas Pacifico by Fred W, Frailey.)

Miles, Texas

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Small cable system at Miles, Texas about 2009.

The first is a small cable moving system at Miles, TX.  During wheat season these tracks would be full of covered hoppers for loading and a track mobile is used to shuffle them around.  During non-wheat season, an occasional car of corn is unloaded here, which is probably why this one car is spotted here, although it is under the loading chute and not over the unloading trough.  The blurred objects in the photo above are birds flying off.  See cable attached to car.  The cable was used to position each bay over the unloading gate.  (It could be used to position under chute as well.)
Reverse angle.  Note cable.

Reverse angle. Note cable.

Rankin, Texas

Now we will visit an industry that had a much larger version of similar technology in Rankin, Texas also on the Texas Pacifico Railroad.

Badger Mining in Rankin, Texas about 2007.

Badger Mining in Rankin, Texas, 2008.

Badger Mining in Rankin, Texas received covered hoppers of frac sand for many years.  It used a cable system to aid in the unloading of the cars.  (Badger Mining relocated to San Angelo a few years ago.  This facility is now operated by Halliburton.)

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The rope is used to pull the steel cable back here so the steel cable can be hooked to loaded cars.

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Empty cars after being pulled down for unloading.  The cars were not uncoupled but moved together.  Nine or ten cars could be moved, this was all the siding could fit.

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Power unit is shown under shelter.

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The roller lifted the steel cable over the unloading trough cover.

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Two pulleys were required, one by the cable reel and this one.

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The electric winch and rope on the right were used to pull the steel cable back down to the left.  You can see the first pulley here just above the steel cable reel.

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The motor on the left, the transmission to the cable reel, and the fuel tank.

When Haliburton took over the operation, things changed.  The cable system was abandoned.

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Cable system deactivated. Note loading grates underneath and to the left of the Union Pacific hopper.

Note cable system is now deactivated.

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This is how the cars are now moved at the Rankin plant.

Fort Stockton, Texas

The last company we will visit in this post is Texsand in Fort Stockton. Texsand also receives frac sand.

Like many frac sand dealers who have had to rush to meet demand, Texsand is challenged in having to transfer a great deal of sand from train to truck with minimum supporting infrastructure.  Initially, Texsand used a front-end loader to move cars.  That proved problematic fairly quickly.

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Damage from using front end loader.

After this, they acquired a track mobile.

Trackmobile at Texsand in Fort Stockton. Texas about 2010.

Trackmobile at Texsand in Fort Stockton. Texas about 2010.

The track mobile was a good solution until the volume exceeded what it could handle.  At that point, the railroad began to switch the operation.  Fortunately, they use mobile conveyors to transfer the sand, so locomotives are only required to move large cuts of cars.

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Conveyor at Big Lake, TX.

Conveyors are common place in the sand business in West Texas.  Today, at Ft Stockton, McCamey, Big Lake (above), Barnhart, and San Angelo, rather than move the cars to a unloading spot over a hole, mobile conveyors move from car to car and transfer the car contents to trucks.  Since there are different grades of sand, cars are not always unloaded in order, and the railroad has to switch out the empties from the loads.

In the next post, we will visit how shippers along B. Smith’s LCN RR, tackle these challenges.

______________________________________________

Until then, I will leave you with a couple of goodies (little modelling opportunities) I caught in Rankin near Badger Mining July of 2008…

Derail at Badger Mining.

An open derail at Badger Mining, 2008.  Note orange paint to denote derail.

I did a three part series on derails earlier this year.

Simple, almost appealing graffiti.

Simple, almost appealing graffiti.

This was on the side of an ATSF hopper in Rankin.  Pretty easy to replicate.

Moving cars …(without a locomotive)

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Using the old John Deere to position a BNSF box car at a rice mill in Beaumont, Texas 2007. photo by C. Hunt

It is fascinating all the different ways that have evolved to move or unload freight cars without locomotives, many of which weigh well over 100 tons.

Track Mobile in Winona MN.

Track Mobile in Winona MN.

The need arises in industries that need to shuttle cars for various purposes but the volume is low enough that the industry cannot justify having a locomotive on hand.  An example is an industry that unloads covered hoppers over one or a few unloading features such as a grate. 

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Using a cable system to move sand cars in West Texas. Photo by B. Smith

Sometimes the unloading device can move so the cars don’t have to move.

farmall

Auger connected to tractor. Fosston, Minnesota 2010. Photo courtesy –http://look4trains.com/2010/07/break-leg.html

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This auger was positioned to unload the below string of cars in Odessa, Texas June 21, 2008. Photo by C. Hunt

Cars awaiting unloading.

Sand cars awaiting unloading.

Lastly, one of my favorites…

aldon2010pg29-ManualCarMover

The manual rail mover. Photo courtesy –http://www.westernsafety.com/aldon2010/aldon2010pg4.html

This devise is good for moving one car short distances at about five feet a minute.

This is the first installment of a three part series on this topic.  This post was a quick overview.  The second will focus on a couple of industries in greater detail.  The last will show how this aspect of railroading has been modelled on B. Smith’s LCN Railroad layout.

Note: The image of a tractor pulling a covered hopper is courtesy http://www.rrpicturearchives.net/, Photo © –E. Clark

A classic! (and many more of them out there)

Recently, Tangent released a PS4750 decorated for the Chicago and Northwestern (ex-Rock).  It is a gorgeous car that has already sold out, but Rock Island versions are still available.  Many other road names are also still available.  I purchased a number of them for my ATSF in Roswell layout  .

201406 Webpage Banner PS4750 Run 3

B. Smith has already weathered his.  Here was his prototype model.

CNW #752383 (ex_Rock) in Altoona, PA on May 17 1989.  Photo by Karl Geffchen, courtesy of http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/

CNW #752383 (ex-Rock) in Altoona, PA on May 17 1989. Photo by Karl Geffchen, courtesy of http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/

Here is the unweathered version.

Unweathered version.

Unweathered version.

Here is the weathered version.

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Now B. Smith is able to evoke a ROCK heritage car on his 1990s layout.

Just as it was in the 1990s, the rails are full of great modelling opportunities today.  Both of the cars below were recently produced by Exactrail.  With a little modification, they’d be right at home on a layout based in 2014.

KYLE #27134 near Fort Scott, Kansas, August 2014 ©photo by Robert Houtwed.

KYLE #27134 (ex-Louis Dreyfus)  near Fort Scott, Kansas, August 2014 ©photo by Robert Houtwed.

Here is an Exactrail car that is still available–

ee-1717-01

Here is one of these now running the rails in Kansas in 2014–

KO #20951 (ex-Aberdeen and Rockfish) near Fort Scott, Kansas, August 2014 ©photo by Robert Houtwed.

KO #20951 (ex-Aberdeen and Rockfish) near Fort Scott, Kansas, August 2014 ©photo by Robert Houtwed.

 Have fun patching and weathering!